Yesterday, today and tomorrow…

The Australian beach culture is a way of life and an iconic part of our history. Surf Life Saving came into being to protect beachgoers and help us continue our summer traditions – yesterday, today and tomorrow.

Did you know that in the early 1900s, changes to the law allowing sea bathing in daylight hours had a dramatic effect on local beach culture? The number of bathers entering the surf dramatically increased; however, as many of these people couldn’t swim, the number of drownings and attempted rescues also dramatically increased.

On 18 October 1907, representatives from Sydney Surf Life Saving clubs, together with members of other interested groups, met and formed Surf Bathing Association of NSW, the organisation which is now known as Surf Life Saving Australia.

Today, there are 311 surf life saving clubs across Australia.

In 2017 there were 10,879 rescues, with surf lifesavers volunteering about 1.35 million patrol hours to protect lives at the beach.

We are very thankful for your support. It’s because of your generosity and ongoing commitment that we are able to continue operating each season and keep you, your friends and family safe, and protected, on the beach.

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FEATURED ARTICLES

Mass rescue on remote beach

Mass rescue on remote beach

Just after 5pm on New Year’s Day, a group of friends and family from Cabramatta were celebrating at an isolated part of Stockton Beach, approximately 2km south of Birubi Headland. Suddenly, two members of the party were swept out of their depth in a rip current. Three other members entered the water in a valiant but unsuccessful attempt to go to their aid. In short order, all five people were now caught in the rip.

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Luke’s remarkable rescue

Luke’s remarkable rescue

Nine-year-old Luke was swimming at his Scouts’ end of year Christmas Party at Myuna Bay on Lake Macquarie, NSW, when suddenly, a fellow Scout started getting pulled further and further from shore by a rip current...

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An opportunity for all

An opportunity for all

Surf Life Saving Tasmania (SLST) has been working hard this summer to provide children with disabilities the opportunity to take part in Nipper activities.

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Awarded for  dedication to community

Awarded for dedication to community

This Australia Day, Andy Murrell was a recipient of the Order of Australia Medal for his dedication to the community, particularly his work with the Portland Surf Life Saving Club.

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Happy Days with Holly Days

Happy Days with Holly Days

Every Sunday morning, Jo Miller from Tamarama Surf Life Saving Club (SLSC), NSW, drives a bus around the Maroubra/La Perouse area, picking up kids to make sure that they can take part in the club’s renewed Holly Days Nippers program.

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Surf lifesavers take centre stage at Commonwealth Games

Surf lifesavers take centre stage at Commonwealth Games

All eyes were firmly fixed on the Gold Coast in April, as the city played host to about 6,600 athletes and team officials for the XXI Commonwealth Games. But it wasn’t just the competitors who drew attention – our dedicated volunteer surf lifesavers stole their fair share of the spotlight too.

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Barry leaves a legacy for future generations

Barry leaves a legacy for future generations

Barry Booth was born in Bundamba, just outside Ipswich, but his family moved to Brisbane when he was about two years old. He has always loved the beach and fondly remembers trips down the coast as a young boy.